Home

Save Shark Sunday

Leave a comment

Each year, 100 MILLION sharks are massacred for their fins. More often than not, the finning takes place at sea. The fins and tail are chopped off and the trunk is thrown overboard and the animal is left to drown. 

In some areas, shark populations have dropped by as much as 90%.1/3 of ALL shark species are facing extinction, many within our life time. Sharks play a critical role in maintaining the fragile balance in our worlds oceans. The fins do not add flavour to the soup, which is a type of chicken broth. Neither do they hold any nutritional value. The fins are added to provide texture.


YOU can help get shark-fin soup off the menu by signing THIS PETITION which I will personally deliver to the owners and management of Johannesburg restaurant Lai Lai Garden. 


Thanks 


Pat

Shark Finning in Mozambique

Leave a comment


The scenes in this clip were all shot on location in Mozambique with the use of hidden cameras. It is estimated that up to 100 million sharks are butchered for their fins each year, mostly to satisfy a Chinese market for shark fin soup. The fins do not add flavour, which is a type of chicken broth. Neither do they hold any nutritional value. The fins are added to provide texture. 


1/3 of all shark species are facing extinction, many within our lifetime. Sharks play a critical role in maintaining the fragile balance in our worlds oceans. It is a slap in the face to all concerned citizens that shark fin soup be allowed to be served in public restaurants.  


YOU can send out a petition to Lai Lai Garden, a restaurant in Johannesburg, South Africa asking them to remove shark fin soup from their menu. Simply click HERE  

Shark Finning –

Leave a comment

Save Shark Sunday

1 Comment

  • Not all species of sharks are required to be in continuous motion to breathe
  • A shark’s teeth are usually replaced every eight days.
  • Some species of sharks shed about 30,000 teeth in their lifetime.
  • As sharks never get cancer, their cartilage is being studied in the hope of developing anti-cancer drugs
  • The Whale shark is considered the biggest fish in the world
  • The Basking shark is the second largest, it is as long as 40 feet.
  • The Pygmy shark is about 11 inches in length
  • The Dwarf shark is as tiny as you hand, while some Whale sharks are as large as a bus
  • The Dogfish sharks are so named, because they attack their prey like a pack of wild dogs
  • Great white sharks can grow about 10 inches every year, thus, they grow to mature lengths of 12 to 14 feet
  • Up to 100 MILLION sharks are killed each year for shark fin soup. By contrast, less than 50 people are killed by sharks each year!

Pic of the Day

Leave a comment

Stunning!

Mossy Leaf-tailed Gecko

Leave a comment

I have always had a fascination for gecko’s. There is something about them that I find incredibly appealing. At one stage I had a cat that shared my fascination with these creatures although she would bring them into the flat to torment. I could hardly blame the cat though, for this is in their nature.

I recently stumbled across the following images of the Mossy Leaf Tailed Gecko. I am posting these to share with the readers of this blog just how absolutely incredible their camouflage is. 
 According to Wikipedia, this species is to be found in the forests of Madagascar. These geckos can also change the colour of their skin, much like  chameleons do. They have dermal (skin) flaps that further break up their outline when they are at rest. They are listed on appendix 2 of CITES as loss of habitat and collection for the pet trade threatens them.

These gecko’s are nocturnal, their large, yellow lidless eyes with elliptical pupils are well suited to their night time habits. During the day, they usually spend their time resting vertically on branches and tree trunks, with their heads facing downwards. At night they will venture out in search of prey. They are insectivorous and will eat a variety of insects.


Blink and it is GONE!!!
The adults measure on average between 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm’s) and while they are to be found in captivity, they do not fare particularly well. WWF have listed this species on their “Top 10 most wanted list” of animals threatened by illegal wildlife trade. They are being captured and sold at an alarming rate. As far as reproduction is concerned, they will lay eggs are laid +/- every 30 days and take around 90 days to hatch. 

Great White more threatened than tigers!!

Leave a comment

Great White Shark, taken off Gansbaai, SouthAfrica. Amazing shot! I am hoping to do a cage dive soon. Will let you know how it went of course. Damn! I am looking forward to it. 
The one thing that really scares me is not the multiple rows of around 3000 teeth. Not at all. The thing that really terrifies me is the fact that these apex predators from the ocean are more threatened than tigers! Yup, you read that correctly. More threatened than tigers!
Like tigers, great whites are a top predator and, like tigers, they have suffered in recent years from habitat destruction and hunting. But unlike tigers, great white sharks get little public sympathy, said Dr Ronald O’Dor, senior scientist at the Census of Marine Life, a 10-year study into ocean wildlife.
An article in The Guardian mentions that the number of Great White sharks has dropped to an alarming 3500. This is really frightening, especially when one considers that the demand for shark fin soup has risen steeply over the last few years. Popular movies, such as Peter Benchley’s “Jaws” where these creatures are portrayed as villains don’t help one iota. 
We need to take drastic action. Seriously. Boycott all restaurants selling shark-fin soup. The damn dish has no nutritional value at all and is not doing the environment any good.
On a more positive note, the USA have taken a step in the right direction, and are now at the forefront of shark conservation. The US Senate recently passed the Shark Conservation Act, which bolsters the prohibition of shark-finning in US waters. If you would like to know more about this you can click HERE 

Older Entries