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"The Seals of Nam" – a true horror story

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Ok. So Christmas has come and gone and we sit here patiently waiting for the new years celebrations to begin. As I reflect on the year behind me, I can honestly say 2010 was a most rewarding year. Sure it had it’s low points, but I chose at the beginning of the year to make a difference, not only in my life, but in the lives of others as well. I bungee jumped the worlds highest, I walked with cheetahs, I climbed a mountain, I joined Sea Shepherd, I helped organize anti whaling demonstrations and am now busy with THE SEALS OF NAM 

The Seals of Nam getting beaten to death in Namibia



“The Seals of Nam” is an initiative whereby I hope to bring ALL interested parties from around the world to join forces in condemnation of the cruel and barbaric practice of seal clubbing. 91 THOUSAND Cape Fur Seals are clubbed to death on the beaches of Namibia. 67 THOUSAND Harp Seals are clubbed to death on the ice floes of Canada. 21 March 2011 is International Human Rights Day. It is Namibian Independence Day. And… it is the day set aside for international protest action for the thousands of seals brutally clubbed to death each year. 


You, the reader of my humble blog, are also invited to take part and become active in trying to stop the gross and inhumane practice of seal clubbing. Don’t think that as an individual you can’t do anything. There is LOADS you can do to become involved. This evil thrives because good people are not taking any action.  


Here is a list of just a few things you can easily do. Not only will you be doing a favour for the seals of Namibia and Canada, but you will also feel good about yourself, knowing you have played a role in trying to prevent this annual slaughter. 


Spread the word. Inform media, radio stations, news papers etc.Tweet and blog the about “The Seals of Nam -a true horror story.” For more info on the horrors of the Namibian Seal Cull, click here 

Invite all you Facebook friends and e-mail contacts to this global event.http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=142174952503151

Start a protest in your city for the 21st March 2011. Its actually easier than you think. Here are some tips  Keep me informed on progress, so I can open communication channels between groups from the same place. This will make the campaign so much more effective.

You can sign online petitions and send mail to celebrities asking them to actively support and promote our initiative. Pamela Anderson, Paul McCartney and Charlize Theron are known to actively protest against the fur industry. Charlize in particular. She comes from South Africa and Namibia is its neighbour. Charlize supports the rhino cause as well as many others. Here is one contact address for her

Charlize Theron:
Postal address: c/o United Talent Agency
9560 Wilshire Blvd.
Suite 500
Beverly Hills
CA 90212
USA

Oprah is looking for people to interview for her final seasonSuggest Francois Hugo from Seal Alert SA who has been at the forefront of this fight for years. Ellen Degeneres is also big into animal welfare. The more people who request it, the greater our chances at getting the exposure we so desperately need.

Contact all the big name movements (and the little ones too), Sea Shepherd, Greenpeace, PETA, Bridget Bardot, WWF, Coalition to Abolish Fur Trade, WSPA, Animal Liberation Front, Vegan Society etc. Inform them that there is not a single animal charity to have an active campaign to protect “The Seals of Nam” Invite them to join this global initiative, where interested parties put aside their differences and work towards the common good. We shall, despite our differences, unite as one in condemnation of these atrocities. March 21 2011 is not only Human Rights Day and Namibian Independence day but ESPECIALLY the day for Cape Fur Seals, “The Seals of Nam” Provide these organizations with a link to this facebook events page.http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=142174952503151

As the groups join, they are to please indicate the Name of the Org on the wall, the name of the contact person, city or region and provide a link to their website. I will update the page accordingly and they will be credited as being “on board” If I miss one in error, they can please remind me by contacting me directly so I can fix.

Hatem Yavuz is the sole buyer of Cape Fur Seal pelts. He drives this murderous cull. You can mail him your thoughts. Tell him his time as “King of the Cull” is up. Here are contact details for his business
Hatem Yavuz Deri
43A Ethel Street
Seaforth
Sydney
Australia
…tel: (61-2) 9948 5366
e-mail hatemyavuz@superonline.com
If you do get a response, please post it on the event page.

You can also send mails to the Namibian Government. Here is a list  of all their embassies, high commissions and consulates. Tell them you will boycott not only their tourism, but also all Namibian produce and you will actively discourage people from visiting their country if they do not end the cull. You can inform travel agents and ask them not to promote Namibia as a destination.Provide an alternative solution to the cull, such as large scale eco-tourism, which will not only generate increased wealth, but will also lead to the creation of many jobs in a country desperate for employment.

The SPCA in Namibia have both the legislative power and mandate to end this cull. Not only are they not living up to their name, The Society for PREVENTION of CRUELTY to animals, but they have CONDONED this madness, publicly stating that the violent clubbing of 91 000 seals to death is HUMANE!! I kid you not. Here is a news article
The Animal Protection Act of 1962 (Namibia) applies to all animals, it governs both domestic animals as well as wildlife. The act clearly states that beating an animal to death is an act of cruelty. This link will take you to the contact page of their website. Please feel free to send them as much hate mail as you wish.

Francois Hugo of Seal Alert SA with one of his beloved seals



At the time of writing this post, I am pleased to announce that Seal Alert SA and Oceanic Defence have confirmed full support. I have Pete Bethune from Earthrace signing off on funding and getting final confirmation and Sea Shepherd have also expressed interest. 


Thanks so much. Have a safe holiday and an amazing and productive 2011. 



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Do Captive Dolphins Die of Boredom??

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In September 1982 the Seaquarium’s performing dolphin named Poncho died of intestinal failure. His intestines literally exploded. Now we know why. 
This photo was presumably taken by Miami Seaquairum Vet. Greg Bossart. In Poncho’s stomach were found:
• 2 Deflated Footballs
• 31 Coins
• 21 Stones
• 1 Trainers Whistle
• 1 Ten Penny Nail
• 2 Screws
• 1 Metal Tag
• 1 Piece of Wire
• 1 Metal Staple
• Several Other Unidentifiable Objects



“They get bored in captivity,” says former dolphin trainer Russ Rector, “They pop the footballs and swallow them whole.”

According to marine biologists dolphins living and dying in the wild rarely have anything other than fish in there stomachs but in captivity this is a common occurance.
“People seem to think the dolpin tanks are wishing wells and throw coins in. The dolpins snatch them up and swallow them,” says Rector, “At Ocean World (now closed) one of our dolpins died of zinc poisoning from swallowing too many pennies.”


Bag a Bob-Cat

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The 26 November was World Wide Fur Free Day. Fur Free South Africa, in conjunction with the Global Fur Free Initiative, held demonstrations in Johannesburg. It was attended by a fair number of people.

While putting together a portfolio of cruelty, which I will use in educating others about the fur industry, I came across this clip on You-tube. Watch this and then tell me if YOU think this is acceptable.

Trapping is responsible for the death of over 10 MILLION animals each year. Personally I feel trapper mentality belongs in an era of loin cloths. Not the 21st century. You don’t need to be a member of PETA to realise this is a cruel practice.

Barbaric. Utterly Disgusting.

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I have been criticized as being a bit “over the top” with regards to my love and passion for wildlife, nature and the creatures I share the planet with. I have resigned from my crappy poor paying job in the corporate world. It may be good for some people, but sitting behind a counter, shuffling paper back and forth and dealing with a chain of incompetent useless idiots… well it brought me not one iota of happiness. It was Ghandi, I think, who said “Our future depends on what we do in the present.” And this IS the present. So what AM I doing? I am raising awareness, sharing ideas and fighting rampant cruelty as best as I can. I have joined up with Sea Shepherd. Some of you groaning “those lunatics!” Yes. Sea Shepherd. Lunatics? Watch this clip and decide for yourself before you condemn the folks who actually have the balls to do something about protecting the marine environment.

My attempts may be in vain, after all saving the life of one animal will not change the world, but it will change the world for that one animal. At the end of the day, when all is said and done… will you have said more than you have done? Thanks Gina for these wise words. For one so young and yet so aware, you are an inspiration. You are already the voice that animals do not have.

Save the Rhino!

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Poaching of African rhinos has risen 2,000 percent in the past three years & Rhino horns fetch up to $30,000 per pound.

The poaching of rhinos for their horns has risen dramatically over the last year and a half, conservationists report.

These crimes are fueled by demand for African rhino horn from the Asian market, where it can fetch more than $30,000 a pound ($60,000 per kilogram).

Africa is losing a rhinoceros every other day. South Africa, which holds more than 80 percent of the continent’s rhino population, has been losing at least 20 rhinos per month.

“Within South Africa’s national parks — not counting private land there, where poaching was rare — there were 10 rhinos poached in 2007,” said Matthew Lewis, senior program officer for African species conservation for the World Wildlife Fund. “Thus far in 2010 alone, more than 200 rhinos were poached within South Africa, with a lot of those poached outside national parks, so that’s a more than 2,000 percent increase in just three years’ time.”

The horns might weigh 6.3 to 8.1 pounds (2.9 to 3.7 kilograms) on average. Bits of crushed horn are a prized ingredient in traditional Asian medicines.

The crisis in Africa

Two species of rhino are native to Africa, while three are native to southern Asia. Of the two African species, the white rhinoceros is near-threatened, and the black rhinoceros is critically endangered. Some 4,000 black rhinos and 17,500 white rhinos are all that keep Africa’s rhinoceros population from extinction.

Hundreds of thousands of rhinos once roamed throughout Africa. Now highly organized international groups of illegal hunters are using helicopters and deploying technologies including night-vision scopes, silenced weapons and drugged darts to find and kill these giants.

“We’re up against the emergence of really high-tech poachers,” Lewis said. “This tactic of using helicopters and veterinary drugs on darts has really only come out in the last six months to a year. It really points to organized crime.”

Greed and nonsense

Most rhino horns leaving southern Africa are destined for markets in Asia, especially Vietnam, where demand has escalated in recent years.

“A lot of that has to do with how Vietnam’s economy has grown astronomically,” Lewis said. The country’s newly affluent middle and upper class seems to be seeking rhino horn as some kind of miraculous remedy, he said, although its traditional use in Chinese medicine is for fevers and nosebleed.

Rhino horn is made from keratin, “from compacted hair, a very similar substance to the hooves of a horse or a cow, or a person’s own fingernails,” Lewis said. “Taking rhino horn has the same effects as chewing on your fingernails: no medicinal properties whatsoever.”

With prices that high, there’s also the prospect “of creating anything and calling it rhino horn,” Lewis said. “People can throw in all kinds of crazy things, and it could actually be very dangerous.”

Trouble in Asia

Asian rhinos, which generally have smaller horns, seem to be less of a target for poachers. Still, two of the three Asian rhino species, the Javan and Sumatran rhinoceroses, are critically endangered at populations of 40 and 400, respectively, Lewis said, and only 2,400 or so Indian rhinoceroses remain in the wild.

“They were nearly wiped out 100 years ago, and they’re hanging on by a thread,” Lewis said. “Indian rhinos have much larger horns than the other two Asian species, and we’ve seen escalation to their poaching similar to Africa in the past three or four years.”

“We have to raise awareness and get on top of this,” Lewis concluded. “Rhinos could go extinct in our lifetime as a result of this if awareness isn’t raised.” He hopes increasing public awareness about the plight of rhinos could spur a crackdown on the criminals who buy and kill for these horns.

The Namibian Seal Cull

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This is in Namibia, animals beaten to death
• The Namibian authorities have given permission for 86 000 seals to be clubbed
to death – 80 000 of them nursing seal pups. This is the largest slaughter of wildlife in Africa and it happens every year.
• Independent observers have concluded the killing methods to be cruel and
inhumane, causing unnecessary suffering. (See the SA Journal of Science 2010,
106(3/4.)
• Namibia is contravening its own Animal Protection Act, which expressly forbids
beating an animal to death. Hiding in terror.
• It is not about conservation, since there is solid scientific evidence that the
Cape fur seal is being threatened by extinction, and that it does not adversely
affect Namibia’s fisheries. (The quota of pups to be ‘harvested’ now exceeds
the number of pups alive on the first day of the ‘cull’.)
• South Africa stopped its seal culling in 1990 for the above reasons, and Namibia
was advised by the Commission on Sealing to follow suit.
• The Namibian Government has ignored all pleas, stating that it will not be
prescribed to by anyone.
• Clubbers hardly benefit, since they cannot even support their families. We are
advocating the promotion of community-based, sustainable seal-viewing ecotourism,
which already yields 10 times the revenue generated by the sealing
industry.
• There is no market for the pelts any longer, since the European Union has
placed a ban on the import of all seal products. All the pelts are bought by a
single businessman, Hatem Yavuz. He buys the pelts at US$6, whereas tourists
pay US$12 to view the living seals.
We ask that all people who care about other sentient beings should help
end this scourge by:
– Boycotting Namibian products
– Halting all tourism to Namibia
– Writing to organisations worldwide to gain their support
– Speaking for the voiceless by writing to the Namibian press and the Namibian
authorities, eg to the Namibian High Commissioner in South Africa, His
Excellency Mr Philemon Kambala, at secretary@namibia.org.za

Check out other websites such as the Anti-Fur Coalition

or Fur Free South Africa

as well as Seal Alert SA

You can also google petitions which are active in your area and inform as many people as possible as to the plight of these poor animals.