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Shark fin, sea cucumber exports banned in Marshalls

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Finned shark 

MAJURO — Escalating worry about illegal shark fin and sea cucumber exports prompted the Marshall Islands to ban trade in both marine products on Wednesday this week.
Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority Director Glen Joseph announced Wednesday a moratorium on the trade in and export of shark fins and sea cucumbers following reports of expanding illegal export operations in the Marshall Islands.  
The fisheries department’s board of directors voted to place a moratorium on the trade of these two marine products until new procedures are in place to regulate them effectively, Joseph said.
“No one is registered and authorized to fish for sharks, but there are substantive reports that it is happening,” Joseph said.
Sea Cucumbers drying out
The same situation is occurring with sea cucumbers, he said. “Any company involved is required to register and get authorization from the Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority to export sea cucumbers,” Joseph said. But MIMRA officials recently discovered a half-full container loaded with sea cucumbers waiting for export. “We fined the company $10,000 for violating the law,” Joseph said.
In the mid-2000s, the Marshall Islands licensed shark fishing, but after two years, the company fishing for sharks called it quits. According to fisheries officials, many local fishermen sell shark fins to Majuro-based companies for export to Asia. But Joseph said he hopes the new moratorium will shut this down.
The problem with Marshall Islands law relating to marine products is that there are no specifics for regulating the harvest of sea cucumbers, Joseph said. Key issues such as the size that can be harvested and periods during which harvesting is allowed are not spelled out.
“So MIMRA has instituted a moratorium on sea cucumber trade until we develop a management plan,” Joseph said.
Experts from the Secretariat of the Pacific Community are visiting Majuro next week to work with MIMRA on developing a national sea cucumber plan.
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Save Shark Sunday

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  • Not all species of sharks are required to be in continuous motion to breathe
  • A shark’s teeth are usually replaced every eight days.
  • Some species of sharks shed about 30,000 teeth in their lifetime.
  • As sharks never get cancer, their cartilage is being studied in the hope of developing anti-cancer drugs
  • The Whale shark is considered the biggest fish in the world
  • The Basking shark is the second largest, it is as long as 40 feet.
  • The Pygmy shark is about 11 inches in length
  • The Dwarf shark is as tiny as you hand, while some Whale sharks are as large as a bus
  • The Dogfish sharks are so named, because they attack their prey like a pack of wild dogs
  • Great white sharks can grow about 10 inches every year, thus, they grow to mature lengths of 12 to 14 feet
  • Up to 100 MILLION sharks are killed each year for shark fin soup. By contrast, less than 50 people are killed by sharks each year!

Pic of the Day

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Stunning!

Taiji dolphin slaughter 13 January 2011

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I am at a complete loss for words to explain how utterly disgusted I am. My respect for the Japanese as a nation has plummeted to a new low. The image I had of them as one of the most civilised nations has been completely turned on its head. Their reputation has been tarnished forever. This is nothing short of barbaric savagery.

A tribute to Sea Shepherd

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I made this last night for Sea Shepherd SA. Very moving, I hope you like it. No copy right infringement intended. Backing track is Sarah McLachlan. I do not own the rights to the pics, they were taken off the web. I do not make money out of this.

Pic of the Day

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Cool pic!

Do Captive Dolphins Die of Boredom??

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In September 1982 the Seaquarium’s performing dolphin named Poncho died of intestinal failure. His intestines literally exploded. Now we know why. 
This photo was presumably taken by Miami Seaquairum Vet. Greg Bossart. In Poncho’s stomach were found:
• 2 Deflated Footballs
• 31 Coins
• 21 Stones
• 1 Trainers Whistle
• 1 Ten Penny Nail
• 2 Screws
• 1 Metal Tag
• 1 Piece of Wire
• 1 Metal Staple
• Several Other Unidentifiable Objects



“They get bored in captivity,” says former dolphin trainer Russ Rector, “They pop the footballs and swallow them whole.”

According to marine biologists dolphins living and dying in the wild rarely have anything other than fish in there stomachs but in captivity this is a common occurance.
“People seem to think the dolpin tanks are wishing wells and throw coins in. The dolpins snatch them up and swallow them,” says Rector, “At Ocean World (now closed) one of our dolpins died of zinc poisoning from swallowing too many pennies.”


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