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Rhino Wars.

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I put this clip together for You-tube in the hope of increasing awareness to the plight of Rhino in Southern Africa.


Since 2007, there has been a 3000% increase in the amount of rhino illegally slaughtered in South Africa. Their horns are worth more than their weight in gold. This and habitat loss have made the rhino one of the most endangered animals on the planet. To ensure any future survival, the protection and conservation of these animals has reached a critical status. It has been scientifically proven that aphrodisiacs, traditional medicines and beauty treatments made from rhino horn have absolutely no effect what so ever. You may as well use your toe nail clippings.


Ivory Wars –> The Elephants Bloodbath

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Another clip I made for You-tube




According to the Mail and Guardian, over 600 000 elephants were poached in the 1970s and 1980s!!

Worldwide concern over the decline of the elephant led to a complete ban on the ivory trade in 1990. Elephants have been placed on Appendix 1 of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, which means ALL trade in elephant parts is prohibited. Some governments have cracked down hard on poachers. In some countries, park rangers are told to shoot poachers on sight.

Poaching has caused the collapse of elephants’ social structure as well as decimating their numbers. As the price of ivory soared, poachers became more organized, using automatic weapons, motorized vehicles, and airplanes to chase and kill thousands of elephants. To governments and revolutionaries mired in civil wars and strapped for cash, poaching ivory became a way to pay for more firearms and supplies.

23 000 elephants are illegally poached each year. 6% of all Africa’s elephants are brutally slaughtered so their tusks can be hacked out of their jaws. 

The killing stops with YOU!!

Stop the bloodshed. Don’t help to pay for wars in Africa. Don’t buy Ivory or even support stores that stock ivory. 

Do Captive Dolphins Die of Boredom??

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In September 1982 the Seaquarium’s performing dolphin named Poncho died of intestinal failure. His intestines literally exploded. Now we know why. 
This photo was presumably taken by Miami Seaquairum Vet. Greg Bossart. In Poncho’s stomach were found:
• 2 Deflated Footballs
• 31 Coins
• 21 Stones
• 1 Trainers Whistle
• 1 Ten Penny Nail
• 2 Screws
• 1 Metal Tag
• 1 Piece of Wire
• 1 Metal Staple
• Several Other Unidentifiable Objects



“They get bored in captivity,” says former dolphin trainer Russ Rector, “They pop the footballs and swallow them whole.”

According to marine biologists dolphins living and dying in the wild rarely have anything other than fish in there stomachs but in captivity this is a common occurance.
“People seem to think the dolpin tanks are wishing wells and throw coins in. The dolpins snatch them up and swallow them,” says Rector, “At Ocean World (now closed) one of our dolpins died of zinc poisoning from swallowing too many pennies.”


Bag a Bob-Cat

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The 26 November was World Wide Fur Free Day. Fur Free South Africa, in conjunction with the Global Fur Free Initiative, held demonstrations in Johannesburg. It was attended by a fair number of people.

While putting together a portfolio of cruelty, which I will use in educating others about the fur industry, I came across this clip on You-tube. Watch this and then tell me if YOU think this is acceptable.

Trapping is responsible for the death of over 10 MILLION animals each year. Personally I feel trapper mentality belongs in an era of loin cloths. Not the 21st century. You don’t need to be a member of PETA to realise this is a cruel practice.

Barbaric. Utterly Disgusting.

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I have been criticized as being a bit “over the top” with regards to my love and passion for wildlife, nature and the creatures I share the planet with. I have resigned from my crappy poor paying job in the corporate world. It may be good for some people, but sitting behind a counter, shuffling paper back and forth and dealing with a chain of incompetent useless idiots… well it brought me not one iota of happiness. It was Ghandi, I think, who said “Our future depends on what we do in the present.” And this IS the present. So what AM I doing? I am raising awareness, sharing ideas and fighting rampant cruelty as best as I can. I have joined up with Sea Shepherd. Some of you groaning “those lunatics!” Yes. Sea Shepherd. Lunatics? Watch this clip and decide for yourself before you condemn the folks who actually have the balls to do something about protecting the marine environment.

My attempts may be in vain, after all saving the life of one animal will not change the world, but it will change the world for that one animal. At the end of the day, when all is said and done… will you have said more than you have done? Thanks Gina for these wise words. For one so young and yet so aware, you are an inspiration. You are already the voice that animals do not have.

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Dolphins have been declared the world’s second most intelligent creatures after humans, with scientists suggesting they are so bright that they should be treated as “non-human persons”.
Studies into dolphin behaviour have highlighted how similar their communications are to those of humans and that they are brighter than chimpanzees. These have been backed up by anatomical research showing that dolphin brains have many key features associated with high intelligence.
The researchers argue that their work shows it is morally unacceptable to keep such intelligent animals in amusement parks or to kill them for food or by accident when fishing. Some 300,000 whales, dolphins and porpoises die in this way each year.
“Many dolphin brains are larger than our own and second in mass only to the human brain when corrected for body size,” said Lori Marino, a zoologist at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, who has used magnetic resonance imaging scans to map the brains of dolphin species and compare them with those of primates. 
“The neuroanatomy suggests psychological continuity between humans and dolphins and has profound implications for the ethics of human-dolphin interactions,” she added.
Dolphins have long been recognised as among the most intelligent of animals but many researchers had placed them below chimps, which some studies have found can reach the intelligence levels of three-year-old children. Recently, however, a series of behavioural studies has suggested that dolphins, especially species such as the bottlenose, could be the brighter of the two. The studies show how dolphins have distinct personalities, a strong sense of self and can think about the future.

It has also become clear that they are “cultural” animals, meaning that new types of behaviour can quickly be picked up by one dolphin from another.
In one study, Diana Reiss, professor of psychology at Hunter College, City University of New York, showed that bottlenose dolphins could recognise themselves in a mirror and use it to inspect various parts of their bodies, an ability that had been thought limited to humans and great apes.
In another, she found that captive animals also had the ability to learn a rudimentary symbol-based language.

Other research has shown dolphins can solve difficult problems, while those living in the wild co-operate in ways that imply complex social structures and a high level of emotional sophistication.

In one recent case, a dolphin rescued from the wild was taught to tail-walk while recuperating for three weeks in a dolphinarium in Australia.

After she was released, scientists were astonished to see the trick spreading among wild dolphins who had learnt it from the former captive.

There are many similar examples, such as the way dolphins living off Western Australia learnt to hold sponges over their snouts to protect themselves when searching for spiny fish on the ocean floor.
Such observations, along with others showing, for example, how dolphins could co-operate with military precision to round up shoals of fish to eat, have prompted questions about the brain structures that must underlie them.
Size is only one factor. Researchers have found that brain size varies hugely from around 7oz for smaller cetacean species such as the Ganges River dolphin to more than 19lb for sperm whales, whose brains are the largest on the planet. Human brains, by contrast, range from 2lb-4lb, while a chimp’s brain is about 12oz.
When it comes to intelligence, however, brain size is less important than its size relative to the body.
What Marino and her colleagues found was that the cerebral cortex and neocortex of bottlenose dolphins were so large that “the anatomical ratios that assess cognitive capacity place it second only to the human brain”. They also found that the brain cortex of dolphins such as the bottlenose had the same convoluted folds that are strongly linked with human intelligence.
Such folds increase the volume of the cortex and the ability of brain cells to interconnect with each other. “Despite evolving along a different neuroanatomical trajectory to humans, cetacean brains have several features that are correlated with complex intelligence,” Marino said.

Marino and Reiss will present their findings at a conference in San Diego, California, next month, concluding that the new evidence about dolphin intelligence makes it morally repugnant to mistreat them.
Thomas White, professor of ethics at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, who has written a series of academic studies suggesting dolphins should have rights, will speak at the same conference.
“The scientific research . . . suggests that dolphins are ‘non-human persons’ who qualify for moral standing as individuals,” he said.

In the Womb

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3-dimensional ultra sound scan of an dolphin foetus taken by Peter Chan for National Geographic.
  3-dimensional ultra sound scan of an elephant foetus taken by Peter Chan for National Geographic.

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